Oct 092016
 

We are humans. All our friends, mentors and family are. And we are here, dominating this planet. If we never developed, would other intelligent species took over the planet one day? Could dolphins, elephants, crows, chimps, dogs or perhaps rats give rise to a new civilization? Would they be “gentler” with the Nature and each other than we have been? We can not know at the moment.

For all our sins, we are the only force so far which could potentially save life from a global disaster like an asteroid strike.

Wishing for our civilization to disappear, I think, is an immature way of thinking happening sometime withing environmentally aware community. I too might have been like this – when I was ten.

In the book “Ecovillage at Ithaca” (a useful record of an ecovillage development and a part of my ever growinglist of potentially useful books for creating new ways of living)

Liz Walker starts with describing her young son’s attitude, his wish for humans to “just die of” because of species disappearing at an incredible rate. She herself, although shocked, could see his point, as “at the beginning of the 21st century, we face a world that is falling apart at the seams“…

Is it? Or we humans just intrinsically like tragedy, our media picks up on this and paint us a, alas, desirable picture of “our world … drenched in the blood of seemingly endless warfare” and “miserable living conditions for much of the world’s population“.

If we wont to build a real better future, we have to deal with facts, not the ever-changing media theater. Violence, disease and poverty are the enemies of our future. What has been happening to them?

First, I would recommend the well known Steven Pinker’s book

where he meticulously proves the diminishing of violence through the history and talks about the reasons for this.

Here you can find the data on the global decrease of poverty.

Historical data shows that global life expectancy has increased drastically over the last couple of centuries, with substantial long-run improvements in all countries around the world” – according to Esteban Ortiz-Ospina and Max Roser. Is this data good? Let me know if you find otherwise.

Life is wonderful. One of its miracles is the ability to recover. There have been a series of devastating mass extinctions throughout the geologic history of our planet.  In some cases up to 60 percent of species were gone. Of course, it took Nature from 20 to 100 million years to recover the biodiversity (see


for more information). We may argue, that the life would never evolve to be so inventive and resilient if not for those extinction events, but we don’t need another one. According to WWF at the moment we might be loosing between 0.01 and 0.1 percent of all species per year which is 1,000 and 10,000 times higher than the natural extinction rate. We took over the planet, this changed all the ecosystems… Bit since we realised what is happening we ought to change. It could be that the knowledge itself makes it impossible for humanity to avoid the coming change.

Living this change, this is the purpose of the Good New Town project. It has to have solid foundation: verifiable data. Doom and gloom might induce some people to act – for a while. Only complete honesty can sustain the movement.

So let’s question every piece of information coming to us, examine the evidence and try to accept the world as it is.

Originally posted at http://goodnewtown.uk/wishing-humans-dead/

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 October 9, 2016  Posted by at 08:18 Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , ,  No Responses »
Dec 182015
 

Be gentle with all things of nature for everyone

Often we can hear that it is the modern “civilized” humans that exploit and destroy the nature, while the indigenous cultures lived in good balance with the land for many generations. Was this always the rule? The way in which the latest extinction of megafauna happened suggest otherwise.

“Outside the mainland of Afro-Eurasia, these megafaunal extinctions followed a highly distinctive landmass-by-landmass pattern that closely parallels the spread of humans into previously uninhabited regions of the world, and which shows no overall correlation with climatic history . Australiawas struck first around 45,000 years ago,[30] followed byTasmania about 41,000 years ago (after formation of a land bridge to Australia about 43,000 years ago),[31][32][33]Japan apparently about 30,000 years ago,[34]North America 13,000 years ago,South America about 500 years later,[35][36]Cyprus 10,000 years ago,[37][38] the Antilles 6,000 years ago,[39]New Caledonia[40] and nearby islands[41] 3,000 years ago,Madagascar 2,000 years ago,[42]New Zealand 700 years ago,[43] the Mascarenes400 years ago,[44] and the Commander Islands 250 years ago.[45] Nearly all of the world’s isolated islands could furnish similar examples of extinctions occurring shortly after the arrival of humans, though most of these islands, such as the Hawaiian Islands, never had terrestrial megafauna, so their extinct fauna were smaller.[28][29]

An analysis of the timing of Holarctic megafaunal extinctions and extirpations over the last 56,000 years has revealed a tendency for such events to cluster within interstadials, periods of abrupt warming, but only when humans were also present. Humans may have impeded processes of migration and recolonization that would otherwise have allowed the megafaunal species to adapt to the climate shift.[46]

Stone age humans, as close to nature as anyone could be, were bringing the destruction as soon as they could, everywhere they spread. All our ancestors did it. Only then, when perhaps the easy prey was gone, the balance in new ecosystems eventually was established. That’s how Nature works. Any species suddenly received an advantage would spread till stopped by famine, predators and disease.

Only now, when our intelligence has grown enough, we started to think about future. We don’t want to spread till we have to starve because there’s no more resources. We want to study and save other species, even ones which have no nutritional or aesthetic value for us.

There’s no need to do human-bashing. We’ve been very “natural” so far in our desire to spread and conquer. Then our intelligence happened, completely naturally too. Perhaps other intelligent species will rise on this Earth later. We don’t really know if they are going to be gentle with their environment. For us, it is time to search for the new balance on the new level. Originally published on http://goodnewtown.uk/traditional-cultures-gentlewithnature/

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 December 18, 2015  Posted by at 17:22 Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Dec 182015
 

Be gentle with all things of nature for everyone

Often we can hear that it is the modern “civilized” humans that exploit and destroy the nature, while the indigenous cultures lived in good balance with the land for many generations. Was this always the rule? The way in which the latest extinction of megafauna happened suggest otherwise.

“Outside the mainland of Afro-Eurasia, these megafaunal extinctions followed a highly distinctive landmass-by-landmass pattern that closely parallels the spread of humans into previously uninhabited regions of the world, and which shows no overall correlation with climatic history . Australiawas struck first around 45,000 years ago,[30] followed byTasmania about 41,000 years ago (after formation of a land bridge to Australia about 43,000 years ago),[31][32][33]Japan apparently about 30,000 years ago,[34]North America 13,000 years ago,South America about 500 years later,[35][36]Cyprus 10,000 years ago,[37][38] the Antilles 6,000 years ago,[39]New Caledonia[40] and nearby islands[41] 3,000 years ago,Madagascar 2,000 years ago,[42]New Zealand 700 years ago,[43] the Mascarenes400 years ago,[44] and the Commander Islands 250 years ago.[45] Nearly all of the world’s isolated islands could furnish similar examples of extinctions occurring shortly after the arrival of humans, though most of these islands, such as the Hawaiian Islands, never had terrestrial megafauna, so their extinct fauna were smaller.[28][29]

An analysis of the timing of Holarctic megafaunal extinctions and extirpations over the last 56,000 years has revealed a tendency for such events to cluster within interstadials, periods of abrupt warming, but only when humans were also present. Humans may have impeded processes of migration and recolonization that would otherwise have allowed the megafaunal species to adapt to the climate shift.[46]

Stone age humans, as close to nature as anyone could be, were bringing the destruction as soon as they could, everywhere they spread. All our ancestors did it. Only then, when perhaps the easy prey was gone, the balance in new ecosystems eventually was established. That’s how Nature works. Any species suddenly received an advantage would spread till stopped by famine, predators and disease.

Only now, when our intelligence has grown enough, we started to think about future. We don’t want to spread till we have to starve because there’s no more resources. We want to study and save other species, even ones which have no nutritional or aesthetic value for us.

There’s no need to do human-bashing. We’ve been very “natural” so far in our desire to spread and conquer. Then our intelligence happened, completely naturally too. Perhaps other intelligent species will rise on this Earth later. We don’t really know if they are going to be gentle with their environment. For us, it is time to search for the new balance on the new level. Originally published on http://goodnewtown.uk/traditional-cultures-gentlewithnature/

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 December 18, 2015  Posted by at 17:22 Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Jul 012015
 

Did you ever seen self-righteous people fighting for some noble cause yet hurting others (often less fortunate ones) without a second thought? Then you wonder: is this cause just a way of self-expression or even self-promotion, not something they do out of compassion? Have they even got compassion or all this is a very well learned performance? This special coldness in the eyes is the clue, I think.

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 July 1, 2015  Posted by at 08:21 Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Jul 012015
 

Did you ever seen self-righteous people fighting for some noble cause yet hurting others (often less fortunate ones) without a second thought? Then you wonder: is this cause just a way of self-expression or even self-promotion, not something they do out of compassion? Have they even got compassion or all this is a very well learned performance? This special coldness in the eyes is the clue, I think.

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 July 1, 2015  Posted by at 08:21 Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 162014
 

When my kids were small I used to read all sorts of parenting advice. One idea really shocked me (I wish I remembered who said that): If you feel very upset hearing baby cries, then maybe you shouldn’t be a parent at all.

I can’t say I am a good parent but this hasn’t much to do with empathy. Because this is what it is: babies’ cry is pure distress, and it’s very difficult to ignore such a strong and obvious feeling. Especially for highly empathic people.

This is just one example of life advices given by people presuming their personalities to be the only normal or the “best” ones. Some say “all of you have to be consistent”. Others think that majority of people are born to be unimaginative, plain and boring (consistent) and only rare few are worthy of attention and capable of great things.

So much of this is going on in the world. Far too much. Let’s not assume others think or feel just like us. Let’s not think that they have the same goals. Let’s not believe we are an ideal, a measure for the whole human race. Let’s not always behave towards others as we want them to behave towards us… Let’s use our thinking and empathy in every individual human case.

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 November 16, 2014  Posted by at 20:13 Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 162014
 

When my kids were small I used to read all sorts of parenting advice. One idea really shocked me (I wish I remembered who said that): If you feel very upset hearing baby cries, then maybe you shouldn’t be a parent at all.

I can’t say I am a good parent but this hasn’t much to do with empathy. Because this is what it is: babies’ cry is pure distress, and it’s very difficult to ignore such a strong and obvious feeling. Especially for highly empathic people.

This is just one example of life advices given by people presuming their personalities to be the only normal or the “best” ones. Some say “all of you have to be consistent”. Others think that majority of people are born to be unimaginative, plain and boring (consistent) and only rare few are worthy of attention and capable of great things.

So much of this is going on in the world. Far too much. Let’s not assume others think or feel just like us. Let’s not think that they have the same goals. Let’s not believe we are an ideal, a measure for the whole human race. Let’s not always behave towards others as we want them to behave towards us… Let’s use our thinking and empathy in every individual human case.

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 November 16, 2014  Posted by at 20:13 Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Sep 302014
 

There is no such thing as natives, really. Well, maybe only in the Congo river basin – according to this map.

Wikipedia: Map of early human migrations according to mitochondrial population genetics (numbers are millennia before present).
We all are migrants. There is no reason to be hostile to newcomers or to kick anybody from the land they live on. Tribes are coming and going, splitting and merging. Saying “My ancestors always lived here” is misleading. The only pride we can take is in being kind to each other here and now, it has nothing to do with ancestry.
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 September 30, 2014  Posted by at 05:42 Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Sep 302014
 

There is no such thing as natives, really. Well, maybe only in the Congo river basin – according to this map.

Wikipedia: Map of early human migrations according to mitochondrial population genetics (numbers are millennia before present).
We all are migrants. There is no reason to be hostile to newcomers or to kick anybody from the land they live on. Tribes are coming and going, splitting and merging. Saying “My ancestors always lived here” is misleading. The only pride we can take is in being kind to each other here and now, it has nothing to do with ancestry.
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 September 30, 2014  Posted by at 05:42 Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »