Feb 132014
 

CameraZOOM-20140213103420984-picsay

 

My granny was a fanatical crocheter. She made curtains, tablecloths, shirts, cushions, doilies,   anything you could imagine. Some of these are still in the good shape,  some of her craftwork unfortunately is disintegrating – like the fragments of a net curtain I’ ve used to make this heart.  I did two, one is kept by my daughter in her room, this one is in my shop. I am glad I’ve found a way to keep her work alive…

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Jan 302014
 

An art group I’ve helped to create is being treated now as a hunting ground by a religious fundamentalist.  He had patiently waited, he had checked us, he had thought he’s found the most vulnerable one. He made his move. A bible is given, a meeting in his church is arranged.

He has swallowed the bite. He didn’t realise he has been hunted by a serial fanatic-teaser! The game is afoot 🙂

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Dec 262013
 

It is nice to give and recieve presents in the darkest coldest time of the year. But why should this only happen once? I can easily imagine having a special day in every season when people exchange gifts. It would be good both for relationships and for the economy. I think we need to embrace some special seasonal occasions (solstices and equinoxes?) which would bring more cheer and expectations to our lives, and I am not talking just about kids. It feels wrong to have major celebrations only once a year.

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Dec 192013
 

Feeling the need to have some changes in my life, I’ve decided to create the new “Linandara and Artish Folk” website. A proper one. It is going to be about arts, crafts, creativity, lifestyle, ethical issues, located at linandara.com and linandara.co.uk . Few days ago I did a first step: a temporary simple “business card” type website. Everything (like life itself) is a work in progress. There is now a facebook group for the future site, which eventually will have a forum. Please feel free to join the group and I hope you enjoy being in it.

To let people know about the new website I had an idea to do some handmade business cards. They are evolving as I make them. On the back I’ve put some keywords which would describe the future site, topics which would be discussed on it or be associated with it. The list is  changing from card to card. At the moment it includes Arts, crafts, creativity, handmade, fantasy, rationalist, dreaming, emphatic, discovery, freethinking, impressionalist, bohemian, ethnic, eccentric, independent, sci-fi, по-русски, commissions, one of the kind, etc.

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Any suggestions are welcome!

 

********************

 

Захотелось перемен, и я собралась сделать себе новый сайт, посвященный вопросам искусства, рукоделия, творчества, этики и жизни вообще. Сайт будет расположен по адресам linandara.com и linandara.co.uk. Сейчас там проcтая временная страничка. Как и сама жизнь, работа идет методом проб и ошибок. Есть группа посвящена новому сайту. Пожалуйста присоединяйтесь и, надеюсь, всем будет интересно.  Буду рада любым советам.

18-12-13

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Nov 302011
 
Good Things About Life Original Pen and Ink Artwork
 
 
Product Description
Stability, love, beauty, curiosity, freedom, peace, possibility, friendship, comfort, creativity, work, ingenuity, individuality, art, home, hope, kindness, fantasy, reality, independence, truth, happiness, education, nature, persistence, dreaming, nobility, pleasure, determination, honesty…

The artwork is unframed, measuring approximately 21 x 30 cm (8 x 12 inches).

Inspiration/Story Behind This Product
Generally the things I feel good about, probably also revolving around Delta Quadra values from Socionics theory.
Materials Used
paper, pigment ink, black tea, watercolor, gouache
More Info
A one of the kind handwritten text art about good life
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Dec 152008
 

Here it is:
http://www.drlaurablog.com

I can’t say I agree with everything she writes but I certainly appreciate how this modern very conservative American “Mary Poppins” tells mothers to return home and take care of it. And I’ve seen her name in some MBTI description of ESTJ! (double benefit for me in reading her blog then). Anyway, she doesn’t like people spending too much time on the Net, so I better go and do something real 🙂

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 December 15, 2008  Posted by at 06:50 good life, kids, moral issues, socionics Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 212008
 

Once I met an artist who liked my works, bought at least two of them and on one occasion offered me a lift home from an exhibition. So he went inside ( it was our old home), he’s seen kids screaming and running everywhere, worn out cheap furniture, books scattered around, wallpaper badly needed to be changed and so on. And he said something like “to sell art you have to be respectful” (or was that “presentable“). Anyway it sounded that I was not. It really hurt. Well, I think I don’t really live my life to sell art only. Even to do art only. Maybe there are artists, who have a professionally designed gallery instead of the home, a polished blog where they show themselves always positive, happy, concentrated, top class, witty, kind, clever and respectful, but I’m not even going to try doing that. I am just a person. Don’t judge me too harsh. I can have my ups and downs. Some of my artwork and writing is successful, some is horrible, but I’m not going to hide this fact. People can buy my paintings without caring much for who I am – that’s absolutely fine too. But I’m not going to pretend to be something I am not. Probably, I am wrong. Probably I should never have any blogs or “about me” pages. Just pictures. Or better – no pictures at all. Just let them rot in the attic. Or even not making them in the first place – rather doing something useful. Anyway…

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 November 21, 2008  Posted by at 18:29 about me, art, good life, kids, my artworks Tagged with: , , , ,  3 Responses »
Nov 202008
 

An interesting site about natural living:
http://www.imperfectlynatural.com/index.php
I’ve read Janey Lee Grace book “Imperfectly Natural Woman” last year and in some respect it was an eye-opener, especially about unnatural fragrances and other additives. Well I think most people still don’t suspect that if you can smell something – there is some substance in the air and it may be very bad for you. Natural essential oils are easy available, I think lavender (for headache and just very nice smell), Olbas (oil mix for blocked noses) and tea tree (for scratches, etc) are must have in any household. But people still use artificial perfume dispensers to mask perfectly natural cooking smells… Instead you can either open the window, or peel an orange, or boil a bit of apple with cinnamon. I sometime put some mandarin peel in the microwave or hot oven (just for few minutes).

Few years ago I bought a little packet of child juice drink (you know, that square type, with a straw) and found out it was full of artificial colourings. Why??? There is no way a child could see what color is his drink inside the carton.

Another thing which bothers me is additives (colorings, flavourings, even perfume) in medicines. Why again??? I’m an adult person and can swallow any bitter pill if really needed. Even kids at eight can. As our funny doctor said: stick it into his baked beans…

Saying all that, I still have lots of problems trying to feed my family healthy food. I don’t have a strong will, and even small amount of nagging, moaning, screaming or frowning makes me give up. My son often points to me how much factory made food is better than mine. All those E numbers which enhance the flavour plus I’m not a very good cook… Well yesterday improvisational “curry” sauce was a success and I even was asked to make more of it:

Take 2 chopped onions, 2 garlic cloves, some fresh ginger, a teaspoon of
oil, a little bit of lime, cranberry and orange juice, plus a lot of your
favorite dry curry spices (e.g. coriander seed, chili, cinnamon, allspice, curry
leaves, black pepper and so on) and put with enough water in a food processor.
Process until smooth then gently boil for 5-10 min, adding creamed
coconut. Could be added to meat or vegetables when they are almost
ready.

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Nov 182008
 

White Horse Village – changing China:

I watched a bit of this programme yesterday

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/newsnight/5103100.stm

and was somehow surprised by a female presenter attitude. She pointed at a lady and said something like that this unfortunate one has to abandon the idea about going away to work in a factory, instead she is doomed to stay with her kids and work on a farm, and that’s such a hard work. Well, we switched the TV off after that. I think almost any way to earn money is hard, one way or another. It may be the stress (separation from family and home) or unhealthy lifestyle instead of the hard physical work, but the hard bit is still here. Interestingly, I’ve heard there was some research showing that men’s health is worse if they stay at home all the time, women’s health is worse if they go away to work.

I haven’t been to China but I see how in the Russian countryside the city folk dreams to live close to the nature, not just stay here on holidays, but most of the village and small town dwellers wants to move to the city, to give up their land, to fill up yet another huge ugly apartment block. There used to be quite a lot of tension and hostility on the buses, but now the better off people unfortunately mostly use their cars.

Once I was walking through a village, seen a nice old house and decide to take picture of it (no, its not that one). Immediately a very angry elderly lady popped out and started shouting at me. I was surprised – I would count it for a compliment if people started to take pictures of my house or garden. Anyway, she disappeared next year – probably moved to a town…

So, I’m bothered with question: Why people who live close to nature, see the beauty every day, have fresh air to breath and birds to listen to, are often so unhappy, jealous and hostile? Are they already so deeply affected by modern consumer culture watching TV and doing their shopping in towns and cities? In that angry lady’s village, there are crowds of tourist and pilgrims passing by yet local folk don’t even try to organise any farmers market which would be of a great success and helped them to stay afloat, I think. Its just looks like they don’t want to be happy where they are. Even here, in Newtown (Wales) I recon my encounter with xenophobic hostile youngsters shows that there is a class of people why don’t feel any inspiration from marvelous countryside around them, instead they think themselves being on some unfortunate margin of modern society.

PS. And the size of local gardens doesn’t help either. All the fields around, but the ordinary person in Newtown is lucky to have enough land to hung the washing in the back garden! Not surprising there is not much connection to the land.

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Nov 162008
 

I’ve read an interesting article by Dmitry Orlov

http://www.energybulletin.net/node/47157

It compares the collapse of the USSR (which I sort of experienced) with present economic situation. Frankly, I’ve already started to gradually increase amount of tinned and dry food in my storage, buying seeds of edible plants and reducing spending even more.

During the Soviet Union Collapse I was young and naive, lived with my mother and spent most time just dreaming. So I mostly missed it and I don’t feel sorry for that. Now I did criticize the consumer culture living in the USA and UK for the last eight years but I feel a bit upset I didn’t participated. We never went on a cheap holiday to a popular destination, visiting kids’ grandparents instead. We never had flown by a cheap airline (they don’t have flights between the destinations we need!). We never had a car. We were buying mostly second hand clothes. We never had thrown away something we didn’t need anymore but still useful. Instead we were trying to sell it in our Ebay shop – to earn few pounds. I’ve been to hairdressers maybe 3 or 4 times during this period because that would cost too much and personally I don’t like being interrogated about my life during my haircut. We never borrowed any money apart from mortgage which was unfortunately unavoidable. We had to switch heating on in our house only when it was really needed – to save money. We haven’t been buying perennial flowers in big boxes from a plant nursery just to throw them away next season as I’ve seen many people (and councils) do. I’ve been trying make my own compost as I couldn’t afford to buy some (once it did went really wrong :-). We didn’t went much to restaurants. I had nobody to chat for hours on the telephone, mobile or not. We haven’t been replacing old things with new unless we really had to. I’ve missed all that and it looks like its gone for good now…

That’s very good, somebody might say. Yes, but it wasn’t entirely my choice of lifestyle! Well I think all this happened because I didn’t went out to work but stayed at home with my kids and my paintings. That was my choice… although I’d still love to have a Landrover Defender or a motocaravan to visit beautiful and exotic places (Gypsy blood), to have nice organic clothes for the family and to start my own large orchard. Hope dies the last.

Another thing I wanted to say – thank you very much to everybody who sent me kind comments during last few days (sorry for my English by the way). Now that I know that somebody is actually reading what I write – I’m really scarred…

PS. There is a long list of labels (topics, subjects) on the left, so if you want to read say about oil pastels only you can do this. I also have a nasty habit of rewriting old posts or adding something to them – sorry

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Nov 142008
 

It was a nice day. I’ve sold a picture I did in my garden September (moving few hills and houses around). And yesterday I had a call from a repair shop saying my broken PDA has been fixed!
So, another trip to the city is imminent. Last week when we went here I was astonished how city life is strange to me now. And I spent most of my life in cities. Crowds, bad air, rubbish & graffiti… But the choice of things in shops is so much better. Just as well we can’t carry much without a car! Anyway, I’m happy I can see so much sky and green hills from my porch now.
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Oct 312008
 

The Curious Tribe *New To UKTV Documentary* Weekdays, 9pm (from Friday 5th
September) A televisual, anthropological experiment, The Curious Tribe sees
Donal MacIntyre host five members of the Insect Tribe from Papua New Guinea in
his London home. Turning the tables on his own visit to Papua New Guinea, the
tribe swap their war paint for sweaters and travel to Britain to satisfy their
own curiosities about the British way of life. The Curious Tribe, new to UKTV
Documentary, is a look at the ordinary things western society takes for granted,
and through their eyes we begin to discover that some of our own customs and
eccentricities are not as far away from theirs as we might have thought.
Throughout the three-part series, the tribe encounters snow, escalators, beds,
and even a football match.

I really liked that documentary from 2007. It is useful to be able to look at your life from a completely different point of view! Favorite moments: when one of the PNG people is in the winter forest and says something like “how strange and sad it is when trees are without leaves”; when in a church one of them says that man can’t build this, only God. Well, that’s right, man can’t build this without God’s help! We keep forgetting about this.

I enjoyed this “natural” people’s resistance to shopping culture – they couldn’t imagine buying things they don’t need. And a special treat for a person from Russia like me: how PNG people see “retirement houses”. For them its obvious that children abandoned their parents in that nursing care home, didn’t returned the favour for bringing them up! Majority of the people from this planet would probably agreed – but not British or Americans. Mind you, seeing my mother and elderly grandmother arguing horribly all the time with the grandmother rapidly loosing any touch with reality I started looking better towards nursing homes. But I don’t think it is an option in Russia at the moment, for better or for worse.

Anyway I was amazed how healthy the PNG people looked, even women with 7 children. Imagine a British, American or Russian lady with so many kids! Maybe its because they start early in New Guinea…

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Oct 302008
 

Well I don’t like them and partly blame them for decline in numbers of bees and butterflies in Britain. They’re only OK if kids are really playing on the grass. But then of course the lawn won’t be neat! Otherwise its a horrible waste of space, owners efforts and electricity. How well all this ENORMOUS space in Britain could be used by individuals & councils for growing edible, beautiful, wild & beneficial plants! No, its few species of grass in gardens (for keeping up with the Johnses) – and the same at the countryside – for the sheep.

I’m not alone …
Hint of Dementia: Monoculture America

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Oct 302008
 

Best way to preserve fruits is to mush them with sugar & keep in the fridge (our outdoors if it below freezing in winter – it can’t freeze). Very popular in Russia. No cooking, so vitamins are preserved.

Mix 1:1 with sugar for most fruits, put a layer of sugar on top of the jar. You won’t need an airtight lid. It normally keeps OK till next summer. If any mold appears on top – just discard it, the rest of preserve will be fine. For more healthy option you can try to substitute sugar for honey or agave syrup. We do this way our homegrown blackcurrants, white and red currants (last two are better filtered – they make clear jelly – I think its due to high pectin content), kiwi (actinidia), gooseberries, raspberry, rosehip, buckthorn, strawberry, juneberry. Same for wild cranberries, bilberries, lindenberries, dewberries. For the more acidic fruit better to add more sugar (honey, syrup). Use food processor for convenience. There is similar way of preserving sorrel & other herbs with salt.

Frankly I think ordinary cooked jams are a bit of waste of time – they don’t have any health benefits. Although we do apple + aronia (black rowan) or apple + burberries jam or plum jam when we have to much of fruit.

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